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動名詞の意味上の主語


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Title: 動名詞の意味上の主語
Other Titles: The Sense Subject of the Gerund
Authors: 園田, 健二
Authors (alternative): Sonoda, Kenji
Issue Date: 31-Mar-1993
Citation: 長崎大学医療技術短期大学部紀要 = Bulletin of the School of Allied Medical Sciences, Nagasaki University. 1993, 6, p.31-41
Abstract: The possessive case or the objective case is used as the sense subject of the gerund. Which of these two cases is more frequently used in present-day American English (AmE) and British English (BrE)? ("Present-day" here means "the end of the 20th century".) And how have the sense subjects of gerunds changed in usage over the past one hundred years or so? It is the aim of this study to clarify them. The material was gathered from a total of fifty-two weeklies and monthlies published in the United States and Britain from January 1992 to September 1992. Of them, twenty-five were published in the United States and twenty-seven in Britain. The sense subjects of gerunds in present-day English have the following characteristics : (1) In common nouns, the objective case is almost always used as the sense subjects. However in AmE, the possessive case is also sometimes used. (2) In abstract nouns, demonstrative and indefinite pronouns, the objective case is almost always used. (3) In personal names, the objective case is almost always used. However in AmE, the possessive case is also sometimes used. In the names of countries, the possessive case is mostly used in AmE. In BrE, the objective case is also sometimes used. In the names of political parties and companies, the objective case is almost always used. (4) In personal pronouns, the possessive case outnumbers the objective case in AmE, but in BrE, it is the other way around : in BrE, the objective case is used more frequently than the possessive case. What strikes one as most noteworthy in this study is that in personal pronouns, a surprisingly large number of the objective case are used as the sense subjects of gerunds. In personal pronouns, objective forms make up 35 percent of all the sense subjects in AmE whereas in BrE they make up about 61 percent. If we total both of the objective forms and possessive forms currently used in AmE and BrE, possessive forms make up about 49 percent and objective forms about 51 percent : in present-day English, as the sense subject of the gerund the objective case is used almost as frequently as the possessive case.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10069/18189
ISSN: 09160841
Type: Departmental Bulletin Paper
Text Version: publisher
Appears in Collections:Volume 6

Citable URI : http://hdl.handle.net/10069/18189

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