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Incidence of Lenkemia in Atomic Bomb Survivors Belonging to a Fixed Cohort in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-71 : Radiation dose, years after exposure, age at exposure, and type of leukemia


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Title: Incidence of Lenkemia in Atomic Bomb Survivors Belonging to a Fixed Cohort in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-71 : Radiation dose, years after exposure, age at exposure, and type of leukemia
Authors: Ichimaru, Michito / Ishimaru, Toranosuke / Belsky, Joseph L..
Authors (alternative): 市丸, 道人 / 石丸, 寅之助
Issue Date: Sep-1978
Publisher: 日本放射線影響学会
Citation: Journal of radiation research. 1978, 19(3), p.262-282
Abstract: The leukemogenic effect of atomic radiation was examined in relation to age at the time of the bomb (ATB), calendar time, and type of leukemia over the period 1950-71. Confirmed cases of leukemia in the Leukemia Registry, a fixed cohort of 109,000 subjects and the T65 dose calculations provided the basis for the analysis. Calendar time was divided into three periods, 5-10, 10-15, and 15-26 years after the bombs. The larger the exposure dose and the younger the age ATB, the greater was the effect in the early period and the more rapid was the decline in risk in subsequent years. In the oldest group, aged 45 or over ATB, the increase in rlsk appeared later and was sustained in the period 1960-71. Chronic granulocytic leukemla contributed substantially to the total leukemogenic effect initially but made little contribution after 1955. Sensitivity to the leukemogenic effect of atomic radiation not only depended on age ATB but its expression varied by type of leukemia and with time after exposure. Although the effect of atomic radiatlon on the incidence of leukemia in the atomic survivors is now greatly reduced and apparently on the wane, in the period 1966-71 the incidence was still greater than expected, especially in Hiroshima. In the Nagasaki sample, no case of leukemia was observed among the high-dose subjects from July 1966 to the end of 1971. In the study of radiation leukemogenesis in man, continued surveillance of atomic bomb survivors plays a vital role.
Keywords: Leukemia / Radiation, Ionizing / Carcinogenesis, Environmental
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10069/18919
ISSN: 04493060
Relational Links: http://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/110002325744/
Rights: 日本放射線影響学会 / 本文データは学協会の許諾に基づきCiNiiから複製したものである
Type: Journal Article
Text Version: publisher
Appears in Collections:Articles in academic journal

Citable URI : http://hdl.handle.net/10069/18919

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