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Adherence ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis on prosthetic biomaterials: an in vitro study


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Title: Adherence ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis on prosthetic biomaterials: an in vitro study
Authors: Shida, Takayuki / Koseki, Hironobu / Yoda, Itaru / Horiuchi, Hidehiko / Sakoda, Hideyuki / Osaki, Makoto
Issue Date: 14-Oct-2013
Publisher: Dove Medical Press Ltd.
Citation: International Journal of Nanomedicine, 8, pp.3955-3961; 2013
Abstract: Bacterial adhesion to the surface of biomaterials is an essential step in the pathogenesis of implant-related infections. In this in vitro research, we evaluated the ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis to adhere to the surface of solid biomaterials, including oxidized zirconium-niobium alloy (Oxinium), cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy, titanium alloy, commercially pure titanium, and stainless steel, and performed a biomaterial-to-biomaterial comparison. The test specimens were physically analyzed to quantitatively determine the viable adherent density of the S. epidermidis strain RP62A (American Type Culture Collection [ATCC] 35984). Field emission scanning electron microscope and laser microscope examination revealed a featureless, smooth surface in all specimens (average roughness < 10 nm). The amounts of S. epidermidis that adhered to the biomaterial were significantly lower for Oxinium and the cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy than for commercially pure titanium. These results suggest that Oxinium and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy are less susceptible to bacterial adherence and are less inclined to infection than other materials of a similar degree of smoothness.
Keywords: Bacterial adhesion / Implant / Infection / Surface character
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10069/33974
DOI: 10.2147/IJN.S51994
Rights: © 2013 Shida et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. Permissions beyond the scope of the License are administered by Dove Medical Press Limited. Information on how to request permission may be found at: http://www.dovepress.com/permissions.php
Type: Journal Article
Text Version: publisher
Appears in Collections:Articles in academic journal

Citable URI : http://hdl.handle.net/10069/33974

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