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Association between social support and place of delivery: a cross-sectional study in Kericho, Western Kenya


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Title: Association between social support and place of delivery: a cross-sectional study in Kericho, Western Kenya
Authors: Ono, Mayo / Matsuyama, Akiko / Karama, Mohamed / Honda, Sumihisa
Issue Date: 21-Nov-2013
Publisher: BioMed Central
Citation: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 13(1), 214; 2013
Abstract: Background: An estimated 358,000 maternal deaths still occur worldwide each year. The place of delivery is of great significance to the reduction of maternal mortality. Moreover, socio-economic factors, cultural traits, and local customs are associated with health-seeking behavior. This study aimed to explore determinants of association between social support and place of delivery. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from September to November 2011 at Sosiot Health Center, Kericho West District, Kenya. Participants were 303 mothers who brought their babies to the health center for immunization within their first year of life. Women underwent a structured interview using a questionnaire on demographic characteristics and their experiences of delivery including place of delivery and social support. Results: The proportion of deliveries at health facilities was significantly higher in unmarried than married women (93% and 78%, respectively; P = 0.008). Unmarried women whose mothers supported them in housework and whose sisters helped them fetch water were more likely to deliver at health facilities (P = 0.002 and 0.042, respectively) than those without this support. However, married women whose husbands supported them in farming and whose neighbors helped them fetch water were less likely to deliver at health facilities (P = 0.003 and 0.021, respectively) than those without this support. Married women who were advised to deliver at a health facility by their mother-in-law or health staff were more likely to deliver at health facilities (P = 0.015 and 0.022, respectively) than those who did not receive this advice. Multivariate analysis revealed that married women were more likely to deliver at health facilities if they were highly educated (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5); had financial capability (OR = 4.3); had medical insurance (OR = 4.2); were primiparous (OR = 3.5); did not have the support of sisters-in-law for fetching water (OR = 2.2); or were advised to deliver at a health facility by family or neighbors (OR = 2.5).Conclusions: Promotion of delivery at health facilities requires approaches that consider women's social situation, since factors influencing place of delivery differ for married and unmarried women.
Keywords: Kenya / Maternal health / Place of delivery / Social support
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10069/34036
ISSN: 14712393
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2393-13-214
Rights: © 2013 Ono et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. / This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Type: Journal Article
Text Version: publisher
Appears in Collections:Articles in academic journal

Citable URI : http://hdl.handle.net/10069/34036

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